A tribute to the looted maiden of Karyai stranded at the British Museum – “Bring her back” by Sofia Kioroglou

IMG_0061Bring her back- Sofia Kioroglou

https://www.outlawpoetry.com/bring-her-back-by-sofia-kioroglou/

Six draped female figures
Greet me on the porch of the Erechtheion
Enchanting maiden dancers beckoning me
With baskets of live reeds on their heads

Waving their hands on the balcony
Immaculately attired and coiffed
The maidens of Karyai weep over their looted sister
Stranded alone in the cold British museum

I try to wipe a tear off their eyes
And all I get is a dirty look
“Not acting is conniving” she whispered
Alas, one angry stare from you is worse than Gehinnom

* Gehinnom is a small valley in Jerusalem and the Jewish and Christian analogue of hell.

 

https://www.outlawpoetry.com/bring-her-back-by-sofia-kioroglou/

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12 Comments

  1. Yes it is hard. The indigenous New Zealand Maori through our national Te Manawa Museum in Wellington have an ongoing programme to bring home various artefacts taken to foreign countries during the 19th century. They would fully understand where you are coming from.

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    1. Sure! It is a bit of a sore point for us Greeks! Thank you very much for reading and commenting. We had an earthquake yesterday that affected two of our largest islands : Lesvos and Chios! A woman died yesterday and a whole village was utterly destroyed!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Something else we have in common then. We know all about that after our earthquakes last year were so destructive. And our second largest city Christchurch is still being rebuilt after the earthquake of 2011. I hope your Greek isles remain steady from now on. though you are not far from Italy with all its earthquakes.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful poem! I visited Athens in April and completely fell in love with all the beautiful remnants of the ancient Greeks. And I was horrified to see how that Elgin stole those marbles from the Acropolis. And even more when I read that the British Museum refuses to give them back. They belong in the beautiful Acropolis museum. I hope that one day they will be reunited, in Athens, and I’ll go back to see that!

    Liked by 1 person

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